VinUniversity-Cornell Distinguished Lecture Series

VinUniversity is pleased to present a series of talks by well-known researchers and academics from Cornell University. These senior faculty have had significant influence in the advancement of their discipline, and their vision and achievements in research, teaching and their engagement with industry have been deeply influential in setting the research agenda in their fields.

The seminars are open to all members of the VinUni community, and to community members. Attendance is free of charge and pre-registration is required. While some of the talks will go into some technical details, no special technical or business knowledge is needed to appreciate them!

We hope you can join us to listen, be intrigued and inspired!

In 2020 the Distinguished Lecture Series will feature senior faculty from Cornell University, a strategic collaborator of VinUniversity (click here for more information about the VinUni-Cornell collaboration). A schedule of 2021 talks will be released soon).

How to attend:

  • The lectures will be held in the VinUniversity Ballroom-Room G104. Members of the VinUniversity community (students, faculty and staff) are invited to attend the lectures in person.
  • A Zoom link to the lectures will be sent to registered users only, at the email address they used for registration. All non-VinUni participants are invited to join the lectures on Zoom using that link.

Register here!

 

November 25, 2020

Topic: Autonomous, self-driving cars

Time: 5:00PM, November 25, 2020

Speaker:

Mark Campbell

John A. Mellowes ‘60 Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Cornell College of Engineering
See the detailed biography at Cornell Engineering faculty’s page

Autonomous, self-driving cars have the potential to impact society in many ways, including taxi/bus service; shipping and delivery; and commuting to/from work. This talk will give an overview of the history, technological work to date and challenges, and potential future impact of self-driving cars. A key challenge is the ability to perceive the environment from the cars sensors, i.e. how can a car convert pixels from a camera, to knowledge of a scene with cars, cyclist, and pedestrians. This perceived information is typically uncertain, constantly being updated, yet must also be used for important decisions by the car, ranging from a simple change to lanes, or stopping and queuing at a traffic light. Videos, examples, and insights will be given of Cornell’s autonomous car, as well as key performers such as Google/Waymo and car companies. We can then hypothesize together of how our future will look as this amazing technology continues to unfold!

 

December 9, 2020

Topic: Changes in Most Essential Lifeline: The Food Supply Chain

Time: 5:00PM, December 09, 2020

Speaker:

Edward W. McLaughlin

Interim David J. Nolan Dean
Charles Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management
Robert G. Tobin Professor of Marketing
Director of the Food Industry Management Program
Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
See the detailed biography at Cornell Business faculty’s page.

Changes in Most Essential Lifeline: The Food Supply Chain

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted, many times over, the complex and vital role that the food supply chain plays in meeting the basic needs of consumers around the world.  Changes in consumer buying patterns, food production, distribution bottlenecks and new governmental restrictions have added immeasurably to the challenges of bringing food to households.  This seminar will discuss the functioning of the global food system and the disruptions that have beset it as a result of the pandemic.  Various outcomes for the future of the food supply chain, food companies and consumers will be explored.

 

December 12, 2020 – January, 2021

Speaker:

Joseph Halpern

Professor of Computer Science
Joseph C. Ford Professor of Engineering
Cornell College of Engineering
Professor of Mathematics
Cornell College of Arts and Science
See the detailed biography at Cornell Business faculty’s page.

VinUniversity and CECS are pleased to announce a lecture series by Professsor Joseph Halpern from Cornell University who is an expert on the logic behind the math of everyday events.

This 3-part lecture series includes some fascinating insights on game theory, the uncertainty that rules our daily life and to which extent common knowledge affects our decisions. The talks are appropriate for a general audience since it does not require knowledge in mathematics. Thus, whether a high school or university student, or a distinguished professor, everyone will learn something new. The only thing you need to bring with you is your curiosity. Part of the talk is interactive, so you will have the chance to actively participate, in an effort to give answers to fundamental philosophical and practical questions.

  1. Knowledge and common knowledge in multi-agent systems

Time: 9:00AM, December 12, 2020

  1. Using Multi-Agent Systems to Represent Uncertainty

Time: 8:00PM, December 18, 2020

  1. Actual Causality: A Survey

Time:  January 2021 (exact date TBD)

 

December 16, 2020

Topic: Integrating Teaching, Research, and Industry Relations for Synergy and Relevance

Time: 5:00PM, December 16, 2020

Speaker:

Gary Thompson

Professor of Service Operations Management
School of Hotel Administration
Area Coordinator for Operations, Technology and
Information Management
Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
See the detailed biography at Cornell Business faculty’s page.

Integrating Teaching, Research, and Industry Relations for Synergy and Relevance 

The aim of this talk is to develop the ideas that teaching, research and industry relations are complementary.  By industry relations, I mean interacting with industry, selecting research problems of interest to industry, and writing for the industry audience. I will use two personal examples of the linkage between the three areas. The first example, in the domain of workforce scheduling, developed from my dissertation and main research agenda pre-tenure.  That lead to a complex scheduling black-box program I created for a large hospitality company, a primer series of four industry-oriented reports, and to material that I still use in class.  The second example, restaurant operations optimization, was driven by an Excel®-based simulation model I created for an undergraduate class.  The evolved into a research tool which lead to 13 academic papers and 9 industry-focused reports and tools.  I will show a short demo of the current version of the teaching simulator, which continues to evolve as students use it in class.

 

Register here!